October 2, 2014

How the Fast-Lived Fashions of Technology Could Start to Limit our Personal Sense of Style

"In order to be irreplaceable one must always be different."


- Coco Chanel

With a multitude of sweaters, jeans, skirts, shoes and even headphones to choose from, it's easy and fun to create an identity through personal style. For example, I've recently fallen in love with bright colors mixed with black and white patterns. There are so many ways to wear the two, the combinations are exponential. Here is peek at how I tried it the other day, fall being the time to start having fun with layering. 








The panel at the retail tech summit during SFFW (San Francisco Fashion Week) briefly debated the difference between fashion and style, adding that fashion, with such quick seasonal changes is nearly impossible to chase, and that it's important to experiment with a style for oneself rather than chase what is 'now'.

Clothing in all its forms has the ability to conform to us in beautiful ways - buttons, clasps, zippers, patterns and materials each serve it's unique purpose to us.

When I saw how Net-a-Porter timidly approached the Google Glass project, (what outfits to wear with your Glass shown below)



and the Apple Watch gaining more attention from techie "fanboys" rather than anyone with an interest in fashion, it made me think...

They are missing the point.


It's one thing to play with the latest gadget, to have fun and see how it can make your life a little easier, a little more entertaining... but fashion is meant to compliment a person's unique style, and flatter their best assets while serving as a tool for comfort. If the tech companies continue down a path that is solely focused on showing off the technology rather than caring about the person wearing it, we will be too busy chasing after the latest electronic trend to question if we're all just starting to look like clones.